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Focal Length and Lenses

Learn about focal length and how it affects photographs

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Focal Length and Lenses

279 words, estimated reading time 2 minutes.

Focal length, usually represented in millimeters (mm), is the basic description of a photographic lens magnification. We also look at the different types of lens available.
 
Introduction to Photography Series
  1. What is Photography?
  2. Focal Length and Lenses
  3. A Guide to Camera Shooting Modes
  4. Understanding Shutter Speeds
  5. What is Depth of Field
  6. Exposure Triangle: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO
  7. Composition in Photography
  8. White Balance Explained
  9. Flash Photography
  10. How To Use a Tripod

Focal length is not what is commonly believed, the actual length of a lens, but instead a calculation of an optical distance from the point where light rays from an object focus on the digital sensor or 35mm film surface. The focal length of a lens is calculated when the lens is focused at infinity.

The focal length of the lens describes the angle of view - how much of the scene will be captured, and the magnification - how large the object will be. The longer the focal length, the narrower the angle of view and the higher the magnification. The shorter the focal length, the wider the angle of view and the lower the magnification. This is demonstrated in the images below.

Visual example of various lens focal lengths
Visual example of various lens focal lengths

Types of Lens

There are two main types of lens available - zoom lens and prime lenses. A prime lens has a fixed focal length, such as 50mm or 135mm. Zoom lenses are able to change zoom and are expressed as a range, such as 70mm - 300mm.

Examples of various lenses
Examples of various lenses

There are many advantages of zoom lenses; they are much more versatile as you don't need to keep changing lens risking dust entry into the camera body and onto the sensor.

Prime lenses on the other hand usually have higher quality optics designed specifically for the set focal length. They are often cheaper as there are fewer lenses internally and fewer mechanisms, something which also makes them lighter and more compact. They also tend to have a wider maximum aperture, say f/2 or even f/1.4 which are a distinct advantage when shooting in low light conditions.

Last updated on: Sunday 18th June 2017

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